Smart Factory Automation

Improve manufacturing asset efficiency and avoid unplanned downtime with data analytics. Avoid manufacturing machine failures and reduce maintenance costs with machine learning. Service Pack Optimization. IIot Data Analytics. Manufacturing Analytics.

The Internet Of Things

More devices become connected to a central controller. This set-up allows manufacturers to gather more data and streamline and digitize their processes more efficiently.

Machine-To-Machine Communication

The success of data exchange and autonomous automation (two of the primary characteristics of Industry 4.0) depends on the machines’ ability to communicate and their real-time responses with one another.

Big Data

Data is crucial to Industry 4.0. Thanks to Iot, data will come from many different sources, and manufacturers will need them to make sound, real-time decisions.

What is a Smart Factory and its Role in Manufacturing?

The smart factory is defined as a factory where physical production processes and operations are combined with digital technology, smart computing and big data to create a more opportunistic system for companies that focus on manufacturing and supply chain management. The smart factory are an aspect of Industry 4.0, a new phase in the Industrial Revolution that focuses heavily on real-time data, embedded sensors, connectivity, automation, and machine learning.

The smart factory is defined as a factory where physical production processes and operations are combined with digital technology, smart computing and big data to create a more opportunistic system for companies that focus on manufacturing and supply chain management. The smart factory are an aspect of Industry 4.0, a new phase in the Industrial Revolution that focuses heavily on real-time data, embedded sensors, connectivity, automation, and machine learning.
As factories evolve in light of the data revolution, businesses need to rethink how they handle everything from automation strategies to workforce development tactics. Along the way, manufacturers will need modernized tools, including robust, flexible enterprise resource planning systems as a data and transactional backbone, that help them adapt quickly as they build toward a smart-factory future.

What Does a Smart Factory Look Like?

The easiest way to envision a smart factory is in comparison to a more traditional, but still modernized, production environment. As manufacturers have embraced automation in today's climate, many have automated systems in various parts of their operations. They may have tools to automate elements of the supply chain, such as on-line production machinery, barcode scanners, drones that help with picking, or similar tools. At the same time, a production line may be automated so an item can go through various phases of manufacturing without human intervention using robotics. Testing and quality control could feature cameras and sensors that automate much of the work there as well.

But in many factories, each of these automated processes is disconnected with one another, requiring frequent human intervention to handle transitions between various phases of operations. What's more, the lack of connectivity between machines and across lines of business means that human workers are constantly analyzing disparate data sets and reports to identify problems and potential areas for efficiency gains. The factory of the future is one in which these disparate systems are no longer isolated. Data and process workflows will be optimized across lines of business, from the warehouse to the shop floor and the sales office.